Add, subtract … almost anything goes when it comes to hummus

Many, if not most, of my cooking stories and memories are attached to my time in Germany.

I was an au pair — a nanny with less pay and more responsibility who lives with the family . . .

January 23, 2013  — Originally published in the Nevada Appeal

Many, if not most, of my cooking stories and memories are attached to my time in Germany.

I was an au pair — a nanny with less pay and more responsibility who lives with the family.

Photo by Wheeler Cowperthwaite for the Nevada Appeal. Hummus is made much easier with either a blender or a food processor.
Photo by Wheeler Cowperthwaite for the Nevada Appeal.
Hummus is made much easier with either a blender or a food processor.

Before I flew across pond, I had cooked some on my own. I moved out of the dorms early because I loathed not being able to cook for myself.

As the au pair, I was in charge of cooking for a family of four and also for cooking for guests, visiting family and parties.

I had always toyed with idea of hummus before and as a kid my parents would buy it at the specialty grocery store and add garlic powder and lemon juice. The German family had a party coming up so I decided to dive in, head first.

I found out where one of the middle eastern stores was — beneath the train station, across the corner from the Asian store where I bought cilantro by the roots — and procured the key: tahini, or, sesame seed paste. I made sure the chickpeas soaked overnight, found the pressure cooker, keyed up the recipe and blended to my heart’s content.

The hummus was a hit, as were the whole-wheat pitas I made with the aid of a baking stone. Now that I’m back state-side, I can forego making the pita bread in favor of buying it but I still make the hummus. I love it so.

One of the creature comforts Americans take for granted in the kitchen is the mighty slow cooker, which I use any time I need to cook beans. In Germany, it was near impossible to find a slow cooker. The only option was to import and have a voltage downgrader to operate on Europe’s higher voltage.

One could use canned chickpeas, but, where’s the fun in that?

When it comes to hummus, I go heavy on the garlic because I can. The recipe has less garlic than I personally use. When I was in Germany, it was verboten to serve anything with garlic, unless the eaters didn’t have to go to work the next day. Even then, it was iffy.

When it comes to hummus, any number of adjuncts can be blended and added, chopped and added or even added whole. Artichoke hearts, bell peppers, roasted garlic, the list goes on.

I base my recipe size on eight ounces of tahini, which in ratio, calls for a (dry) pound of  chickpeas. I buy the tahini  from Trader Joe’s in the refrigerated section, near the hummus. There, it is labeled “Tahini Sauce.”One of the keys to using a blender to make the hummus is to add just enough liquid to the beans so they can easily be blended. Reserve some of the water the legumes are cooked in or, some of the water in the cans.

Another sticking point for hummus can be its texture, which is entirely dependent on the tastes of the cook. I prefer a rougher hummus, often times with a few whole chickpeas left in. For a creamier hummus, blend all the chickpeas at once. For a chunkier, blend only a portion fully, and partially blend or don’t blend, the rest.

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 pound dry chickpeas (also called garbanzo beans) — around 7 cups cooked
  • 8 ounces tahini
  • 1 /3 cup lemon juice
  • 2 tablespoons lime juice
  • 3 tablespoons chopped garlic, more to taste
  • Salt, to taste
  • 1 /3 cup reserved chickpea cooking water
  • Artichoke hearts (optional)

DIRECTIONS

1. Soak the chickpeas overnight in cold water, three times the quantity of water to chickpeas. Cook the chickpeas until tender, with a few dashes of salt. If made in a slow cooker, cook on low for at least five hours.

2. Drain the chickpeas, reserving 1/3 cup of the cooking water.

3. Add 2/3 of the chickpeas (or all, to make a creamier hummus) into a blender or food processor, along with the lemon juice. When blending, a little more liquid can help facilitate the process. Add a few tablespoons of cooking water as needed.

4. Add the tahini and continue blend until everything is mixed. Once the chickpeas blend with the tahini, the color should change to a lighter shade of yellow.

5. Decant the mixture into a mixing bowl and add into the blender the garlic, the lime juice and, if using, the artichoke hearts or other ingredients and blend.

6. Add the new mixture into the mixing bowl and stir until well combined.

7. Add salt, or garlic salt, to taste. Start with two teaspoons. Just enough salt will make the flavors of the hummus pop.

8. Add the rest of the chickpeas, either only briefly blended or whole, depending on texture desires.

9. Refrigerate or enjoy immediately. The hummus will get just a little bit better and thicken after it has been refrigerated.

DA files murder charges against Patrick Dunn

ELKO — Patrick Dunn told investigators he tried to dispose of the gun he used to shoot Erik Espitia during an altercation early on May 27, according to court records.

The narrative of the alleged murder of Erik Espitia was filed at the Elko County Justice Court Friday afternoon, including a narrative of events according to witnesses . .

June 02, 2012 —  Originally published in the Elko Daily Free Press

DA files murder charges against Patrick Dunn as a PDF

ELKO — Patrick Dunn told investigators he tried to dispose of the gun he used to shoot Erik Espitia during an altercation early on May 27, according to court records.

The narrative of the alleged murder of Erik Espitia was filed at the Elko County Justice Court Friday afternoon, including a narrative of events according to witnesses.

The Prelude

Two groups left two different bars shortly before 3:15 a.m. Sunday, according to the investigation by Elko police detective Dennis Price.

The group leaving Cantina La Hurrabura was composed of Erik Espitia, Salvador Espitia, Raul Perez-Munoz and Esther Espitia.

The other group, leaving the Tiki Hut, was composed of Patrick Dunn, Chance Creamer, Brandon Evans and Angela Evans.

Brandon Evans was flown to Salt Lake City for injuries he suffered during the alleged fight that followed, according to police.

The two groups walked toward their respective cars, in the downtown parking corridor near the 400 block of Railroad Street.

When the groups got near to each other, “words were spoken which eventually led to a confrontation between the two groups of people,” according to the court documents.

The view from the car

Angela Evans, part of the group leaving the Tiki Hut, told investigators that she was there when the fight started and at one point “she attempted to intervene in an altercation” between Patrick Dunn and another person.

She was thrown to the ground after attempting to intercede in the fight Dunn was involved in, according to court records.

Angela Evans then “took a seat in the rear driver’s side passenger seat.”

She then heard a gun shot come from the rear of the car.

From the side

According to Salvador Espitia’s narrative, he was fighting Chance Creamer and “at one point he had Mr. Creamer pinned up against a vehicle.”

Creamer and Salvador Espitia agreed to stop fighting and watched Dunn go to the vehicle and retrieve the .40-caliber pistol.

Salvador Espitia grabbed Dunn by the hair, according to court records.

Dunn pointed the gun at Salvador Espitia. Salvador Espitia let go of Dunn’s hair.

Suspect told police

Patrick Dunn told investigators he “became involved in an altercation” with Erik Espitia. Dunn told investigators he was either fighting three or four individuals or there were three or four individuals fighting.

Dunn said he was kicked to the ground and, at one point, got up and “lost his snap,” according to court records.

Dunn told police he went to his vehicle, grabbed his gun, cocked it and fired it at Espitia.

He said he did not remember he or Espitia speaking prior to him shooting the gun.

Tossing the gun

When the investigator asked Dunn where the gun was, he said he had “taken it ‘into the hills’ and ‘tossed’ it under a tree.”

Dunn went with the investigators and showed them the area in which he threw the gun.

Detectives found the gun and a nylon holster.

The aftermath

Elko District Attorney Mark Torvinen charged Dunn with open murder with the use of a deadly weapon, assault with a deadly weapon and attempted willful destruction of evidence of the commission of a felony.

He is not eligible for bail.

Espitia is survived by his wife, three children and unborn child, as well as brothers, cousins and mother, according to a message on a memorial in the downtown corridor.

A car wash in the Red Lion parking lot will be held today, from noon to 4 p.m., to raise money for his family and for his final expenses.

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DA files murder charges against Patrick Dunn as a PDF

http://elkodaily.com/news/local/da-files-murder-charges-against-patrick-dunn/article_af252930-ac65-11e1-a276-001a4bcf887a.html

Freedom Ride: Group travels across U.S. to honor veterans

ELKO — The thunder rolled into Elko Wednesday night with a police escort and roared out of town Thursday morning with honk, a smaller escort and a single salute.

The Freedom Riders, on the National Veterans Awareness Ride, were treated to dinner Wednesday night at the Veterans of Foreign Wars Gasper J. Salaz Post 2350. The VFW, American Legion Post 7 and the POW/MIA Elko Awareness Association all helped to put on the dinner . . .

May 18, 2012 —  Originally published in the Elko Daily Free Press

ELKO — The thunder rolled into Elko Wednesday night with a police escort and roared out of town Thursday morning with honk, a smaller escort and a single salute.

The Freedom Riders, on the National Veterans Awareness Ride, were treated to dinner Wednesday night at the Veterans of Foreign Wars Gasper J. Salaz Post 2350. The VFW, American Legion Post 7 and the POW/MIA Elko Awareness Association all helped to put on the dinner.

National Veterans Awareness Ride National Coordinator Jerry Conner makes sure the ride goes smoothly.

“It’s organized to the minute,” he said.

When Conner addressed the assembly at the VFW Post, he said he was amazed by the reception Elko put on.

“If we get this kind of help along the whole U.S., we’ll be safer and 10 pounds heavier by the time we get (to Washington, D.C.,)” he said. “We’ve got the whole damn town of Elko out here.”

The American Legion, POW/MIA Awareness Association and the VFW donated the food and their time to put the dinner on, American Legion Commander James Macpherson said.

Anyone who wants to join the ride can find the schedule at www.nvao.us.

Why we do it

The riders started Wednesday morning in Auburn, Calif., and headed to Reno’s Veterans Association Medical Center. They greeted every veteran and took the in-hospital vets on a walk, or a push in a wheelchair, around the neighborhood, spending the time to get to know them.

“We did a walk and roll,” said Mike Kline, 64, a veteran of the Vietnam War from Iowa.

“Sometimes we’re the only visitors (the vets) get for a whole year,” he said.

The group will ride to Washington D.C., by Memorial Day and go to the Vietnam Memorial Wall.

“The fact that I could stop and thank the vets, that’s why I got involved,” Kline said.

Kline, who was drafted into the military and served in 1964 as a medic in the 25th infantry division, added a thousand miles to his normal ride from Iowa to California and the capitol by taking a southern route.

“I rode from Iowa down to Texas,” he said.

In Amarillo, Texas, on his way to Auburn via a southern route, he was riding with a group of five other veterans. They stopped at a local restaurant and talked with an elderly couple.

By the time the group went to pay for their dinner, more than $200 for the six of them, they found the elderly couple had already paid the tab, presumably just because they were veterans going on a cross-country tour to visit with other vets.

“We were just amazed that somebody would do that just because we’re vets,” he said.

In Reno, Kline visited with Carl, a vet with a paralyzed leg.

Kline went to the trailer the group hauls behind them and gave Carl a National Veterans Awareness Ride hat.

“The sun was shining so hard,” Kline said. “He was so shocked or happy or overwhelmed, I’m not sure what the right word is. You would have thought I’d given him a million dollars.”

How much the simple act of kindness meant to Carl, an embossed hat to keep his sensitive skin from burning beneath the spring sun, is why Kline rides.

Buzz

No one knows Paul Neeb by his first name on the ride. They all know him as Buzz.

For Neeb, from Ann Arbor, Mich., it’s the eighth time he’s done the run.

Neeb, 75, volunteered for the draft for the Korean War because his brother was there.

“The war was just winding down, so I didn’t get to go to Korea,” he said.

Neeb looked around the lobby at the veterans milling about, some eating their continental breakfast. “I don’t have the same hardships of these Vietnam vets,” he said.

Buzz’s time in Reno was spent with a 90-year-old woman who was a nurse during World War II.

“We talked for 15 minutes,” he said. “They’re so happy to have someone to talk to them. It can get pretty damn emotional.”

Each ride is dedicated to a vet who has died. This year the ride is dedicated to Neeb’s old friend Craig, whom he rode with.

Neeb had lunch with Craig’s widow and picked up Craig’s old riding vest.

He will wear the vest for the length of the ride and Craig’s widow will fly to the capitol and leave the vest at the wall, trying to find some kind of closure.

“It’s going to be hard when we get there,” he said.

Filling the void

While many of the Vietnam veterans felt the sting of coming home to an unwelcoming country, they had each other.

Carol Scamara, from Sonora, Calif., felt it from both the military and civilian sides.

“When you came out of the conflict, you didn’t tell people where you were,” she said.

The sense of belonging she, and other veterans, feel on the ride is part of the reason she goes.

“To go on something like this, where you’re just accepted,” is something she needed.

“It fills a little bit of a void,” she said.

It’s not just the veterans of the Vietnam era who want that belonging.

When Carol visited the Reno VA medical center Wednesday, she met with a veteran named Jerry in the breakfast room.

“Don’t let them leave without me,” he told her, referring to the riders.

Jerry couldn’t leave without his vest though. The nurse fetched the vest and put it on him.

“He said, ‘Now, I’m ready to go,’” she said.

Jerry looked down at his legs.

“I’m out of uniform,” he said.

“I had to put the pin (a small metal National Veterans Awareness Ride ribbon) on his vest,” she said. “It brought us all to tears. He just wanted to belong.”

Carol and her retired Marine husband Larry are on the ride for the first time.

“(Larry) turned 65, so that’s what we wanted to do,” she said.

Larry is conscious of his age, both old and young.

“I need to go now because, health wise, if I don’t go, I may never,” he said.

But it isn’t just his maturity he’s conscious of.

Larry joined the Marines when he was 17 and went to Vietnam at 18, he said.

Carol chimed in: “He graduated as a sophomore in high school” when he joined at 17.

Larry’s first tour was 18 months, in 1969. He went back for two more tours.

Larry went on to have a career in the military and finally retired in 1986.

“I’d always heard about the rolling thunder,” he said. “My friend went two years ago and talked about how it was a life changing experience.”

For Larry, it will be his first time visiting the wall. He will be leaving a poem for a dear friend who lost her brother, he said.

The poem isn’t the only thing he’ll be leaving; the Scamaras have been picking things up along the way since they started Tuesday.

“The wall stirs up the past,” he said. “It stirs up a lot of guilt. Lots of friends were killed.”

Larry himself would have been killed had it not been for a soldier who replaced him on patrol.

“He was shot and killed,” he said. “He had just gotten there a month before.”

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Freedom Ride: Group travels across U.S. to honor veterans as a PDF

http://elkodaily.com/news/local/group-travels-across-u-s-to-honor-veterans/article_688013fe-a0f9-11e1-b726-001a4bcf887a.html

Burning Questions: course teaches how to investigate a fire

ELKO — The facts, at the outset, were few. A fire had charred the ground, although the cause was unknown.

A lady was camping out of her Jeep Cherokee, hanging out right next to the burn drinking whiskey from a bottle with her small dog on a pink leash.

She even managed to intimidate some of the firefighters . . .

May 22, 2012 — Originally published in the Elko Daily Free Press

ELKO — The facts, at the outset, were few. A fire had charred the ground, although the cause was unknown.

A lady was camping out of her Jeep Cherokee, hanging out right next to the burn drinking whiskey from a bottle with her small dog on a pink leash.

She even managed to intimidate some of the firefighters.

“She freaked us out,” said Elizabeth Gameros, a volunteer firefighter with Storey County since 2007.

The lady wasn’t really crazy and the fire didn’t get out of control because it was set by firefighters as part of a week-long class in fire investigation.

The northern Nevada area is bereft of enough fire investigators and Greg Liddicoat, who was leading the class, wanted everyone to succeed.

Investigating fires is a system, not magic. It is structured so that every fire investigation goes the same way, every single time.

“It’s a systematic methodology,” he said.

Liddicoat said he wanted the students to come away with one thing, more than any other. He wanted them to be able to do a fire investigation the same way time and time again.

“Once you learn it (the system), it becomes easy,” he said.

If they could teach that to their fellow firefighters, fellow police officers, fellow deputies and coworkers, they had probably learned the system right.

“I love this,” Liddicoat said. “I’ve been doing it for 33 years.”

The crazy lady kept on sitting in her chair, her dog wrapping itself around the legs of one of the students who was trying to figure out what she knew and saw and whether she started the fire or could lead him to who did.

Wading through the ashes

The role-playing scenario was part of the fourth day of the fire investigation class. It was meant to take the ducks out of the water and put them in the ashes of a brush fire.

Don Unruh was one of those ducks, or more aptly, one of the deputies with the Elko County Sheriff’s Office, taking the class. Because part of his job is to interview subjects, he wasn’t allowed to do the talking. It was his forte.

Instead, he would be getting down on his hands and knees and searching, often with a magnifying glass, through the remains of the fire.

The class has changed Unruh’s entire outlook on his job.

“I wish I could apply this to cases I’ve already had,” he said, referring to the methodology of the class.

The class, Unruh said, was about investigation, but investigation through a system, often of documentation.

“Document, document, document and map the points,” he said.

“I’m going to apply the methods, procedures and documentation” as a deputy, he said.

The class forces the students to think about even the “tiniest details,” he said.

“It really enforces the need not to shoot from the hip,” he said.

Unruh will be applying the methods he’s learned as an often-times first responder to fires.

“We’re usually the first or second on scene,” he said.

Goodbye, comfort zone

Unruh soaked up the instruction and the methodology and so too did Gameros. She, on the other hand, had to interview the crazy lady and exit from her comfort zone of heat and light and ash to whiskey, people and a small dog.

The crazy lady who freaked Gameros out was actually Liddicoat’s wife, playing crazy for the day, to help the students deal with a real-life scenario.

“It’s good to role-play to get used to dealing with these people,” Gameros said.

Gameros liked the class just as much as Unruh and said she, much like him, will be able to go back to her department and teach the system and methodology she learned.

She already teaches CPR and first aid and now she can add fire investigation to the list.

“I want to help out the (Storey County fire) department,” she said.

If nothing else, the class has been an incredible experience for her.

“I’ve learned so much in the past week,” she said. “The hands-on element is amazing.”

Arsonists, negligent parties beware

“We’re really short,” Elko City Deputy Fire Chief Mike Hecht said. “We’ve only got three (investigators) in the whole area.”

The class will produce more investigators, though it may take up to two years before these students can graduate to investigating fires on their own.

The students must go with one of the current three investigators to a series of fires and get their task books signed off on, Hecht said. The complexity of the fire determines how many more they must go on.

“We won’t have to pull (an investigator) from Battle Mountain or Winnemucca,” he said.

Hecht was co-teaching the class.

Arsonists who don’t want to end up in jail aren’t the only ones who need to realize that fire investigation is a serious matter.

By the policies of most agencies, most fires need to be investigated, Greg Liddicoat said.

“Where the fire starts determines who picks up the bill,” he said.

Fire investigation, and the classes, have been evolving and growing stronger because of the increased costs of fighting fires and the necessity of finding out who will be paying for them.

And if the fire is human-caused, the party may very well be liable for the cost of the fire fighting.

“It’s not getting cheaper,” Liddicoat said. “Negligence can lead to a bill,” he said.

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Burning Questions: course teaches how to investigate a fire as a PDF

http://elkodaily.com/news/local/course-teaches-how-to-investigate-a-fire/article_b50fcfc4-a424-11e1-903e-0019bb2963f4.html

New law requires off-road vehicles to register

ELKO — Off-highway vehicles are ubiquitous in Nevada, from dune buggies on Sand Mountain to hunters retrieving their kills.

Come July 1, Nevada residents who want to buy an off-highway vehicle, such as an all-terrain vehicle or snowmobile, will have to register it within 30 days after purchase. Residents who already own OHVs will have to register them with the Department of Motor Vehicles by July 1, 2013 . . .

June 23, 2012 — Originally published in the Elko Daily Free Press

ELKO — Off-highway vehicles are ubiquitous in Nevada, from dune buggies on Sand Mountain to hunters retrieving their kills.

Come July 1, Nevada residents who want to buy an off-highway vehicle, such as an all-terrain vehicle or snowmobile, will have to register it within 30 days after purchase. Residents who already own OHVs will have to register them with the Department of Motor Vehicles by July 1, 2013.

OHVs purchased out of state after July 1, 2012, will have to show that Nevada sales tax has been paid on them before they can be titled and registered, according to the Department of Motor Vehicle’s website.

Aye, there’s the rub

“The original genesis is because people were buying (OHVs) out of state with no title and no sales tax,” Off-Highway Vehicles Commission Chairman Paul Jackson said.

An ATV that costs $6,000, at a sales tax rate of 7 percent, costs an extra $420 in sales tax.

OHVs bought before July 1, 2012, will not be required to show proof of paid sales tax in the state.

The commission, which is appointed by the governor, has been working for six years to ready the registration regulations, Jackson said.

With an estimated $2 billion spent in the state on OHV recreation, something was needed to administer and maintain the networks of roads.

“That’s billion with a B,” Jackson said.

The fee, around $30, will exclusively benefit OHV trails through maintenance and signage, he said.

OHVs, after July 1, 2013, must be registered once a year.

The forms to register are on the DMV’s OHV website at dmvnv.com/ohv.

The OHV Commission’s website, with information on the subject, will be live on Monday at nvohv.com.

“No one knows how many OHVs are in the state,” Jackson said.

The regulations Nevada has created will allow people with Nevada OHVs to use their vehicles in states that have similar OHV registration programs, according to the Nevada DMV website.

The blanket fine for failing to register, for new OHVs after July 1, 2012, or for older ones July 1, 2013, is $100.

File by mail

“It’s important for dealers to become licensed OHV dealers,” DMV Public Information Officer Kevin Malone said.

The packet for OHV dealers is on the DMV’s OHV website.

All registration, if not done through a dealer, will be handled by mail, Malone said.

OHV owners should not come into a DMV office because all of the transactions and interactions will be done through the mail or online.

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New law requires off-road vehicles to register as a PDF

http://elkodaily.com/news/local/new-law-requires-off-road-vehicles-to-register/article_3cd8aad4-bce9-11e1-94bf-0019bb2963f4.html

Crushing the Future

ELKO — The Italians do a few things very well: sports cars, food, wine and flirtation.

New to the list is specialty construction equipment, except, not in terms of the machines themselves, which belong to the likes of Sweden’s Volvo and Japan’s Komatsu . . .

June 08, 2012  — Originally published in the Elko Daily Free Press

ELKO — The Italians do a few things very well: sports cars, food, wine and flirtation.

New to the list is specialty construction equipment, except, not in terms of the machines themselves, which belong to the likes of Sweden’s Volvo and Japan’s Komatsu.

What the Italians have done is managed to replace the normal bucket on an excavator with a crusher.

But not just any crusher; a crusher that makes variable-sized gravel and, with a sorting attachment, can make laying gravel down a quick and painless endeavor, especially when in remote areas, MB America CEO Miriano Ravazzolo said.

Another garage story

The Italian who invented the excavator extension worked as a contractor and wondered why no such crusher existed.

Commercial crushers cost hundreds of thousands of dollars, cost tens of thousands of dollars to transport, and days to set up and take down.

In other words, nothing practical for small, short or otherwise curtailed or mobile use existed, Ravazzolo said.

“He produced the first one for himself” 11 years ago, Ravazzolo said. “His buddies said, ‘I want this.’”

Today, the current crushers are far more streamlined than the first prototype.

“After 11 years, they’ve been simplified and simplified and simplified,” he said.

Ravazzolo sought for a quote, and finally paraphrased Mark Twain when he said, “If I had more time, I’d write shorter.”

At 10 years, the crusher has had that extra time and it shows in the increased simplicity of the machine, he said.

Kind of a big deal (in Europe)

Since the crusher was introduced into the market, it’s sold 7,600 models in Europe, Ravazzolo said.

In America, on the other hand, the company has only sold a few hundred units.

Ravazzolo based the American arm in Reno, partially because of its proximity to mining and to its proximity to the rest of the American West.

The crusher’s European success is evident in its share of the market it created 11 years ago: 92 percent.

The company, based in Italy, has branches all across Europe and is especially useful for pioneer trails, he said.

Pioneer trails or roads, those which are being built or built up far from a ready source of gravel and base, often cost much more than normal roads because the gravel has to be trucked in, with associated manpower and diesel costs.

The crusher, brought on to a site with the excavator, eliminates the need to truck in gravel or base for new roads.

“You can pick up material wherever you are and make your own gravel,” he said. “You can crush whatever you want.”

The crusher, often with a screener in tow, makes gravel or base that’s up to code for roads, with gravel sizes ranging from 5 inches to a single inch.

Those pesky rocks become the new gravel to travel on.

The whole gamut — from road contractors to utility companies — has been snapping up the crushing buckets in Europe, he said.

Moving on up to the West Side

A water district in California bought its own crusher to help recycle old cement.

The district, in the middle of nowhere, had to dig up and replace old cement water conduits. Before the epiphany of the crusher, they broke up the old pipes and trucked them to the dump.

Now the crews break up the pipes, just as before, but crush them and turn them into the new base for their new pipe system.

The town sees nothing wasted, little trucked in and money saved in fuel costs many times over.

Ravazzolo said the crusher is not for established mines; for those kinds of operations, a dedicated crusher is the most cost effective and efficient solution.

Prospectors, on the other hand, have been paying Ravazzolo extra special attention at the Elko Mining Expo.

Miners aren’t the only market for a crusher; cement companies, looking to reduce their physical footprints and reduce costs, take heed.

Many cement mixing companies use the crushers to process their washout, he said.

The washout, the extra cement that’s been washed out of the cement mixing cylinders, is dropped on the ground and hardens.

With the crusher, this refuse can be crushed and reused in the next batch of cement instead of trucking in that extra load of gravel.

“This is the real recycling,” he said.

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Crushing the Future as a PDF

On the web: http://elkodaily.com/mining/crushing-the-future/article_3a1faaec-b11b-11e1-9dc0-0019bb2963f4.html